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Gillean “Gillean of the Battle Axe” na Tuaighe 1st ChiefAge: 9611741270

Name
Gillean “Gillean of the Battle Axe” na Tuaighe 1st Chief
Given names
Gillean
Surname
na Tuaighe
Name suffix
1st Chief
Nickname
Gillean of the Battle Axe
Birth about 1174

Publication: http://MacLeanclan.com/MacLean-chiefs/gilleain-na-tuaighe
Text:

he first chief of the Clan MacLean was Gilleain na Tuaighe, or Gillean of the Battle-Axe. Known for the weapon he carried, most likely a Lochaber axe which was common in the Western Highlands, Gilleain na Tuaighe was a natural leader, religious man, and well-connected for his day.

Born in 1174 to a wealthy landholder named Rath, Gillean may well have been the brother of Fergus Macerc, who is known to have descended from the Royal House of Loarn which ruled the ancient Kingdom of Dál Riata and immigrated from northern Ireland in 503AD. Gilleain's mother was the sister of Somerled and was a descendant of Niall Noígíallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages), one of the High Kings of Ireland. who ruled from 378 AD until his death in 405.

Quality of data: secondary evidence
MarriageWife of Gillean na TuaigheView this family
yes

Residence about 1250 (Age 76)
Death about 1270 (Age 96)

Publication: John Patterson MacLean (1889). A History of the Clan MacLean from Its First Settlement at Duard Castle, in the Isle of Mull, to the Present Period: Including a Genealogical Account of Some of the Principal Families Together with Their Heraldry, Legends, Superstitions, Etc.. Cincinnati, Ohio. Robert Clarke & Company, 1889.
Text:

In 1263, the Clan MacLean fought at the Battle of Largs under Alexander III, defeating the Norsemen invading Scotland. Although Gilleain na Tuaighe faught in the battle, by that time he had passed the leadership of the clan to his eldest son, Malise mac Gilleain, who was the recognized leader of the MacLeans at the Battle of Largs.

Birth of a son
#1
Malise macGillean
1300 (30 years after death)

BirthClan MacLean History Project
Publication: http://MacLeanclan.com/MacLean-chiefs/gilleain-na-tuaighe
Text:

he first chief of the Clan MacLean was Gilleain na Tuaighe, or Gillean of the Battle-Axe. Known for the weapon he carried, most likely a Lochaber axe which was common in the Western Highlands, Gilleain na Tuaighe was a natural leader, religious man, and well-connected for his day.

Born in 1174 to a wealthy landholder named Rath, Gillean may well have been the brother of Fergus Macerc, who is known to have descended from the Royal House of Loarn which ruled the ancient Kingdom of Dál Riata and immigrated from northern Ireland in 503AD. Gilleain's mother was the sister of Somerled and was a descendant of Niall Noígíallach (Niall of the Nine Hostages), one of the High Kings of Ireland. who ruled from 378 AD until his death in 405.

Quality of data: secondary evidence
DeathA History of the Clan MacLean from Its First Settlement at Duard Castle in the Isla of Mull, to the Presnet Period: Including a Genealogical Account of Some of the Principal Families Together with Their Heraldy, Legends Superstitions Etc.
Publication: John Patterson MacLean (1889). A History of the Clan MacLean from Its First Settlement at Duard Castle, in the Isle of Mull, to the Present Period: Including a Genealogical Account of Some of the Principal Families Together with Their Heraldry, Legends, Superstitions, Etc.. Cincinnati, Ohio. Robert Clarke & Company, 1889.
Text:

In 1263, the Clan MacLean fought at the Battle of Largs under Alexander III, defeating the Norsemen invading Scotland. Although Gilleain na Tuaighe faught in the battle, by that time he had passed the leadership of the clan to his eldest son, Malise mac Gilleain, who was the recognized leader of the MacLeans at the Battle of Largs.

NoteA History of the Clan MacLean from Its First Settlement at Duard Castle in the Isla of Mull, to the Presnet Period: Including a Genealogical Account of Some of the Principal Families Together with Their Heraldy, Legends Superstitions Etc.
Publication: John Patterson MacLean (1889). A History of the Clan MacLean from Its First Settlement at Duard Castle, in the Isle of Mull, to the Present Period: Including a Genealogical Account of Some of the Principal Families Together with Their Heraldry, Legends, Superstitions, Etc.. Cincinnati, Ohio. Robert Clarke & Company, 1889.
Note

The Clan MacLean is also known as Clan Gillean after the person normally viewed as its founder, shown below. A (mythical) ancestry will be shown for him in due course that connects him back to early Irish roots. The following is reported by www.gillean.com as having been taken from a manuscript (the Skene manuscript dated 1467) which appears to be at least in part supported by other evidence. Dugald of Scone (a c1100?) 1. Raing A. Cudollie i. Neil a. Maolsuthain (1) Macrath (A) Gillean 'nan Tuaghe' (of the battle-axe), 1st Chief of MacLean (b c1210) - continued below The link below will be to the mythical ancestry which is the same as the above back to Cudollie but diverges therebefore. BP1934

Note

Gilleain flourished around the year 1250. He was known as Gilleain na Tuaighe, from his carrying, as his ordinary weapon and constant companion, a battle axe. He was a man of mark and distinction. The following anecdote is related of him, which probably accounts for the origin of the MacLean crest, which consists of a battle-ax between a laurel and cypress branch, and is still used on the coat of-arms.¶ He was on one occasion engaged, with other lovers of the chase, in a stag-hunt on the mountain of Bein 'tsheata, and having wandered from the rest of the party in pursuit of game, the mountain became suddenly covered with a heavy mist, and he lost his way. For three days he wandered about, unable to recover his route, and on the fourth, exhausted by fatigue, he entered a cranberry bush, where, fixing the handle of his battle axe in the earth, he laid himself down. On the evening of the same day his friends discovered the head of the battle-ax above the bush, and found its owner, with his arms round the handle, stretched, in a state of insensibility, on the ground.